Difference between revisions of "Reverse connectivity"

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'''Segment locks''', also known as '''manual locks''', are editing restrictions to the road segments in any country that does not have [[Traffic locks|automatic traffic locks]]. This type of lock is manually applied by a higher-ranked editor to a particular segment of road that needs to be protected from accidental change or vandalism. The more important the road, the more likely it is to be locked.
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Other than the fact that they are manually applied by an editor, they function similarly to [[Traffic locks|automatic traffic locks]]. For an overall description of the various types of editing restrictions, see the [[Editing permissions]] page.
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"Reverse connectivity," often abbreviated "revcon" or "RevCon," is a situation where a hidden turn is allowed going the wrong direction into a one-way street (against traffic), or leading the wrong direction out of a one-way street.
  
In brief, there are seven locking ranks. An unlocked segment has a lock rank of 1. 1 thru 6 by the editors and a "staff lock" by the Waze Staff. These six locking ranks correspond to the 6 editor ranks of "1 traffic cone" to "6 traffic cones." To edit a segment, its lock rank must be equal to or below your own editing rank. The segment must also belong to one of your editable areas. See [[Editing permissions]] for full details of all the restrictions and how they interact.
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A connection (turn allowed) from one [[Glossary#segment|segment]] to another via a [[Glossary#junction|junction]] which goes against the directionality of at least one of the segments is called a Reverse Connection, and these segments have "reverse connectivity." This can cause routing irregularities.
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Though it is hard to see this in the editor, two segments of a one-way road connected together could have an allowed "turn" in the opposite direction of the flow of traffic, or directionality, of the segments. This can be seen in the editor by turning both segments to 2-way and then seeing the location of the allowed turns. Several user scripts can highlight revcons, including the [[Community Plugins, Extensions and Tools#Highlights for Landmarks and_Segments|Color Highlighting userscript]], WME Toolbox, and WME Validator. For R5/Country Managers, WME Toolbox can also perform one-click fixes of revcons.
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Revcons can also affect routing instructions, by causing the routing engine to see a possible route where none is allowed. This may cause it to issue an unnecessary but valid instruction, a questionable instruction, or, in unusual circumstances, increases the likelihood of creating an illegal routing plan.

Latest revision as of 10:47, 30 November 2015

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"Reverse connectivity," often abbreviated "revcon" or "RevCon," is a situation where a hidden turn is allowed going the wrong direction into a one-way street (against traffic), or leading the wrong direction out of a one-way street.

A connection (turn allowed) from one segment to another via a junction which goes against the directionality of at least one of the segments is called a Reverse Connection, and these segments have "reverse connectivity." This can cause routing irregularities.

Though it is hard to see this in the editor, two segments of a one-way road connected together could have an allowed "turn" in the opposite direction of the flow of traffic, or directionality, of the segments. This can be seen in the editor by turning both segments to 2-way and then seeing the location of the allowed turns. Several user scripts can highlight revcons, including the Color Highlighting userscript, WME Toolbox, and WME Validator. For R5/Country Managers, WME Toolbox can also perform one-click fixes of revcons.

Revcons can also affect routing instructions, by causing the routing engine to see a possible route where none is allowed. This may cause it to issue an unnecessary but valid instruction, a questionable instruction, or, in unusual circumstances, increases the likelihood of creating an illegal routing plan.